Kirsty Maclean

Kirsty Maclean has been appointed as the new Officer for Iomairt Ghàidhlig Dhùn Èideann. Kirsty, who has only recently graduated, is originally from Inverness but has lived in Edinburgh for a number of years. This news was announced today by Comunn na Gàidhlig (CnaG), who administer the Iomairtean Gàidhlig, on behalf of Bòrd na Gàidhlig.

CnaG Chief Executive, Donald MacNèill, has welcomed Kirsty to the role: “I am very pleased to welcome Kirsty. I am certain she has the commitment, skills and capabilities to further Gaelic development in Edinburgh.”



“Iomairt Ghàidhlig Dhùn Èideann has been successful since it was established in 2010 and I’m sure that Kirsty will continue the work that is already happening and energise the Iomairt with new projects. There are lots of new opportunities ahead for Gaelic development in Edinburgh with the new Gaelic school being established and we hope to work closely with the school”.

Kirsty said, “I am very much looking forward to starting my new job with Iomairt Ghàidhlig Dhùn Èideann. I am committed to Gaelic and am delighted to have the opportunity to help develop the language in Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. It is clear we will have many opportunities here with the new school and we only need look to Glasgow and Inverness, where there have been Gaelic schools established for a few years, to see what progress can be made. I am really looking forward to working with the community in Edinburgh and especially the young people and Gaelic learners in the city”. 


There are now seven Iomairtean Gàidhlig established in different communities throughout Scotland. There are five in rural areas: Lewis, Uist, Skye, Lochaber and Islay & Jura and three in cities: Inverness, Glasgow and Edinburgh.

The Iomairtean Gàidhlig are based on a similar initiative in Wales, where some have now been running for nearly twenty years, evolving to provide various services such as translation, childcare and Welsh classes. The initiatives are funded by both the public sector and private sector, and their primary purpose is to strengthen the Welsh language at community level.

Although it is only a few years since the first Iomairtean Gàidhlig were established in Scotland they have already had an impact on Gaelic in these communities through youth and community events – each project focusing on opportunities to use the language, or providing learning opportunities.